Co-parenting in Colorado for the Good of Your Kids

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Colorado divorce and co-parenting laws heavily lean towards reducing the likelihood of children suffering as a result of divorce. Co-parenting in Colorado is overseen by a law (Colo. Rev. Stat. § 14- 10- 124) which recognizes the importance of the children remaining in contact with both parents, guided by a working arrangement. For instance, the law requires potential divorced persons to attend co-parenting classes before completing a separation whenever minors are in the picture. Here are some useful insights to help as you get ready to take part in co-parenting in Colorado.

Coming up With a plan for Co-parenting in Colorado

The state of Colorado allows parents to come up with a working co-parenting agreement out of court. When formulating the plan, be sure that you have as collaborative and comprehensive a discussion with your co-partner as possible. The agreement should spell out what each parent expects, the dates, times, holidays, any limitations, and other arrangements in as much detail as possible. Be sure to discuss potential disagreements that may arise in the future so you will be ready to handle them should they come along. Given the intense nature of divorces, coming up with a plan independently can be challenging, but it is so worth it; working with a co-parenting counsellor may be helpful. If you try your best and still can’t reach an agreement together, it may be time to bring it to the court. 

Colorado Courts Offer Solutions to Co-parenting Disputes

Failure to come up with a plan outside court is not unusual, especially due to emotions and trauma associated with separation. If you ever are in such a situation, it may be time to involve a Colorado family court. Usually, the court will organize a custody mediation session to facilitate an uncomplicated agreement. But if difficulties persist, the court may escalate the process into a contested court hearing. But if at all possible, it’s best to avoid ending up in court; it’s not only better for you, but also for your kids. 

How to be Involved When Co-parenting in Colorado

Colorado courts want you to achieve the best co-parenting relationship possible. The courts are so serious about this that they may require people filing for divorce to attend parenting classes. If you want to be a great co-parent in Colorado, make a point of paying attention in these classes. The classes help both parents to cope with divorce trauma and to be better co-parents. They offer vital co-parenting guidelines in readiness for a smooth co-parenting journey.

The best single dads co-parenting in Colorado are those whose actions are driven by the pure love for their kids and the willingness to step up whenever the opportunity presents itself. As such, be sure to remember these 4 fundamental practices to effective co-parenting:


 

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  •         Regular and effective communication
  •         Committing to a consistent schedule
  •         Avoiding overreacting to irritating behavior by the mom
  •         Sorting disagreements in private and not in front of kids 

These practices go a long way to making sure you are being the best co-parent you can be, and an awesome single dad. But that said, keep detailed records of your interaction with the mom (but don’t do it infront of her!). The records may contain dates, time, witnesses and more details. Such documentation may save the day in case of a legal proceeding in the future.

Colorado has family laws that focus on the best interests of the children. These laws are aimed at giving the kids the best chance at having both parents remain involved in their lives, while also protecting the rights of the parents. If you find that you are unable to co-parent with the other parent, consider seeing a co-parenting counsellor or, if need be, talk with an attorney who can tell you what to do, and what not to do. At the end of the day, remember it’s all about the best interests of your kids. 

 

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