State by State Breakdown of Average Parenting Time for Dads – Which States Give the Most and Least Time to Fathers

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A study commissioned by the CustodyXChange, just in time for Father’s Day, has determined how much parenting time fathers are given, on average, in each state in the United States. Somewhat surprisingly, the study found that there are twenty states that generally give equal time to both parents, in other words 50/50 custody. On the other hand, there are 24 states that give fathers less than 30% parenting time, and 7 states that give fathers and their children less than 24% of the time together.

In other words, while we’ve come a long way, baby, in the last twenty years, we still have quite a bit further to go.

The states that, on average, award equal parenting time to fathers and mothers alike are Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin.

The states with the worst record for average parenting time to fathers include Washington (23.8%), Ohio (23.7%), South Dakota (23.6%), Georgia (23.5%), Illinois (23.1%), Mississippi (23%), and Tennessee (21.8%).

Below are both an alphabetical list of the states and their average percentage of parenting time to fathers, and the list organized by average amount of parenting time, from most to least.

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state breakdown custody parenting time fathers dads
Credit: CustodyXChange.com

“Custody schedules are detailed and complex, which makes them hard to compare,” explained Ben Coltrin, Custody X Change co-founder and president. “However, it’s easy to see the state-by-state differences once you have a percentage for every state. We conducted this study to be able to easily highlight these differences.”

The CustodyXChange provides tools to help divorced, separated or single parents create and track professional-quality parenting plans.

The research was based on judicial standards along with a survey of legal professionals about the schedules they most often see. The study is based on cases in which both parents wanted custody, and in which there were no complicating factors such as a long distance between the parents, or a parent having a criminal conviction.

Some points of interest include that all of the New England states except for Rhode Island give parents equal parenting time, and that fathers in South Dakota (23.6%) would fare much better had they moved just north to North Dakota (50%).

Says Coltrin, “Our study shows 40 percent of states aim to give children equal time with each parent. We’re hoping this study will affect the dialog that’s taking place as states consider changing their custody laws. States may increase time for dads, as they compare themselves to their neighbor-states.”

It’s important to bear in mind that these figures are from 2018. It’s possible – even probable – that fathers who were divorced in years prior may have received less parenting time than the current average in their state. It’s also possible that this study could support a request for additional parenting time. Ask your attorney if you feel this might apply to you.

List of States and the Amount of Custody Parenting Time They Award to Fathers Organized by Name

Alabama – 33.7%
Alaska – 50%
Arizona – 50%
Arkansas – 28.1%
California – 32.8%
Colorado – 50%
Connecticut – 50%
Delaware – 50%
Florida – 50%
Georgia – 23.5%
Hawaii – 31%
Idaho – 24.1%
Illinois – 23.1%
Indiana – 28.8%
Iowa – 28.3%
Kansas – 26.4%
Kentucky – 50%
Louisiana – 25.4%
Maine – 50%
Maryland – 26.1%
Massachusetts – 50%
Michigan – 27.1%
Minnesota – 50%
Mississippi – 23%
Missouri – 50%
Montana – 26%
Nebraska – 32.9%
Nevada – 50%
New Hampshire – 50%
New Jersey – 50%
New Mexico – 50%
New York – 30.4%
North Carolina – 27.9%
North Dakota – 50%
Ohio – 23.7%
Oklahoma – 26.4%
Oregon – 28.7%
Pennsylvania – 28.2%
Rhode Island – 24%
South Carolina – 27.8%
South Dakota – 23.6%
Tennessee – 21.8%
Texas – 33%
Utah – 26.2%
Vermont – 50%
Virginia – 50%
Washington – 23.8%
West Virginia – 50%
Wisconsin – 50%
Wyoming – 28.6%

List of States and the Amount of Custody Parenting Time They Award to Fathers Organized by Percentage of Parenting Time – Most to Least

Alaska – 50%
Arizona – 50%
Colorado – 50%
Connecticut – 50%
Delaware – 50%
Florida – 50%
Kentucky – 50%
Maine – 50%
Massachusetts – 50%
Minnesota – 50%
Missouri – 50%
Nevada – 50%
New Hampshire – 50%
New Jersey – 50%
New Mexico – 50%
North Dakota – 50%
Vermont – 50%
Virginia – 50%
West Virginia – 50%
Wisconsin – 50%
Alabama – 33.7%
Texas – 33%
Nebraska – 32.9%
California – 32.8%
Hawaii – 31%
New York – 30.4%
Indiana – 28.8%
Oregon – 28.7%
Wyoming – 28.6%
Iowa – 28.3%
Pennsylvania – 28.2%
Arkansas – 28.1%
North Carolina – 27.9%
South Carolina – 27.8%
Michigan – 27.1%
Kansas – 26.4%
Oklahoma – 26.4%
Utah – 26.2%
Maryland – 26.1%
Montana – 26%
Louisiana – 25.4%
Idaho – 24.1%
Rhode Island – 24%
Washington – 23.8%
Ohio – 23.7%
South Dakota – 23.6%
Georgia – 23.5%
Illinois – 23.1%
Mississippi – 23%
Tennessee – 21.8%

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1 thought on “State by State Breakdown of Average Parenting Time for Dads – Which States Give the Most and Least Time to Fathers

  1. This poll is fraud

    Would you recommend any other sources?

    I pose this question to you. In Florida Rick Scott boasts big numbers of creating jobs in addition to saying that even that validates him for denying universal health care. You and i know those figures and polls are a lie because those are part time jobs and certainly not ones that pay a living wage etc.

    It does not take long for we the people to figure out the problem, defect, or lie in a poll.

    On the front lines of the issue this poll is a red flag on the play because if in fact florida was 50/50 in “practice” then it would of been ratified in “law” instead of vetoed by rick scott when the florida house and the florida senate passed 50/50 custody bills for the governor to sign.

    Reading the article 50/50 custody is the appearance in florida and other states because only a small group of people were polled.

    “The research was based on judicial standards along with a survey of legal professionals about the schedules they most often see. The study is based on cases in which both parents wanted custody, and in which there were no complicating factors such as a long distance between the parents, or a parent having a criminal conviction.”

    -Judicial standards- depending on what community you ask we know not to trust the administrators of justice to rate themselves on performance honestly.

    -Survey of legal professionals setting criteria for schedules they deem are 50/50- you are talking about family law attorneys who rely on conflict for cases and for prolonging cases, thus you have them setting “fixing” the criteria for the family plan also known as the custody or time share agreement. What they consider good enough for fathers or 50/50 certainly deserves scrutiny. So if they fix the poll and said this is the standard for 50/50 out of a small criteria of ppl who actually get it you created a false positive and helped the state and the industry avoid audit and scrutiny.

    Cases where both parents want custody- how many parents have committed suicide (dead no longer want or can see there kid get it) how many have gone out and committed crime out of displaced anger (that dont or no longer can see their kid) how many have been dragged into poverty and homelessness due to child support while alienated from their child (that dont or can no longer see their kid), the courts do an effective job of exterminating fathers, you cannot accurately poll something based on who wants to see their kid allowing the industry to set the criteria another false positive to manipulate perception.

    -No complicating factors- are we starting to get a picture here. How do i create a fraudulent poll? Remove all factors that would hurt the outcome i want to project.

    -Distance- how do i create a fraudulent poll remove all factors that would hurt the outcome i want to project. Take a poll on how many mothers who mostly get custody by default haul ass and move away with the kid no wonder this factor was removed from the poll.

    -Parents with no criminal background- this brings race and class into question. At this point i think i have proven my point.

    Florida wants to appear equal when it is not in any sense of the word it is classist, it is sexist, and it is racist and its not hard to see why or think it far fetched when we look at history.

    Family court is tied to dependency court which is operated with social services of DCF department of children and families, GAL the guardian ad litem, foster care and homeless shelter industry and when allegations are made the SAO aka the state attorney prosecutor of the criminal courts. When you look at the statistics of the break down of families and dysfunction occurring, these institutions rely upon dysfunction continueing to exist and within each avenue have their own narrative and profiling. This goes back to why Florida did not blanket the land with 50/50 LAW regarding custody because this would interfere with the aggravating factors that generate revenue for each governing entity. This would have protected fathers instead of leave them abroad at the mercy of a judges discretion which translates to a judges industry bias. Exorcising equity only for goldilocks cases ie apparently the only cases surveyed, and exorcising procedural bias for the rest of us.

    Thus i am implicating the news agency reporting this information and the entity that created the poll as to being in on the fraud projected.

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